ShootAnyAngle.com Wedding Photography Blog

What story will your photos tell? We're a husband and wife photography team, and we want to capture your special day so you can relive it every time you look at your photographs! On this blog, you'll find all things wedding to inspire you for your big day! Check back often for posts on photography, DIY, dresses, decorations, and more!


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Wedding Day Timelines

I’ve seen that one area of difficulty for a planning bride is how to create a timeline and what comes when.  It varies from religion to religion and culture to culture, but here are the basics so you can create your timeline!

Let’s start at noon:

12:00-3:00pmSet-up

  • This will depend on your decorum and your rental company, but some need 3 hours to set up all tables, chairs, lighting, and decorations.  Talk with your rental company (or venue, if they are handling it) about how much time they need.

3:00-4:00pmGetting Ready

  • An hour may seem like a lot, but if you need hair and make-up and to get in your dress, an hour is a good idea.  Plus, you’ll be followed by your photographers during this time as well as your bridesmaids as they get ready.  If you just need to get in your dress, you can cut down this time.  If you want posed photos or a “First Look” prior to the ceremony, add an hour after getting ready for that.

4:00-4:30pmCeremony

  • Ceremony lengths vary.  We’ve seen 5 minutes, we’ve seen half an hour, and we’ve seen a full hour-long mass.  For the purposes of this timeline, we’ll assign it to half an hour.

4:30-5:30pmCocktail Hours and PhotosEJ17WM

  • It’s always a good idea to allow an hour for posed photos.  This will (hopefully) take you away from your guests, so this hour is a good time for them to mingle, grab appetizers and a drink, and sign your guestbook.  We recommend having the cocktail hour in a separate location from where you are taking your photographs.  Otherwise, you’ll get curious guests mingling around you and potentially disrupting the photos.

5:30pmAnnouncement of Couple and First Dance

  • Once you finish with your photos, it’s time to greet your guests as husband and wife.  Generally, your DJ or a bridesmaid/groomsman will announce you so you can enter the party formally.  Many couples follow this announcement with their first dance and then go straight into dinner.  Others choose to hold off on the first dance until after dinner.

5:30-6:30pmDinner & Toasts

  • Even with the appetizers, your guests will be hungry – though probably not nearly as hungry as the two of you will be!  So, this is a good time for dinner.  Toasts can happen before dinner or towards the tail end of everyone eating.

6:00-7:00pmGolden HourJAH_6882WM

  • This is just an estimate, but if you want to shoot at Golden Hour (the hour just before sunset when the sun is low and there is a golden glow over everything), then check to see when sunset is, and schedule the photos for the hour approaching sunset.  These photos are best if it is just the two of you.  Everyone else can finish up dinner, while you take some shots in this magical glow.

6:30/7:00pmFirst Dances

  • If you haven’t had your first dance yet, have it now.  That’s followed by the Father-Daughter Dance.  If you wish to have a Mother-Groom Dance, you can do that with the Father-Daughter or just after.  My personal feeling is that each dance should be kept separate in order to give each couple their own special time.  If you wish to do a Money Dance, this is a good last dance of the “First Dances” because it can lead into everyone dancing.  After the first dances, it’s a good idea to ask your DJ to announce free-for-all dancing.

7:30-8:30pmDancing

  • Dance the night away!

8:30-9:00pmBouquet, Garter, Cake Cutting

  • About an hour into dancing, it’s a good idea to switch gears to the bouquet toss and garter toss (if you are having this event).  For our wedding, we used the song “Single Ladies” as a transition and had it announced that all the single ladies come to the dance floor for the bouquet toss.  Then, you can go straight from that to cake cutting.  You don’t want to wait too late to cut the cake because some guests will want to retire early.  Once that’s done, start the music again, and let the party continue!

9:30-10:30Dancing

  • More dancing!

10:30-12:30Breakdown

  • This may need to be longer, so again, talk with your rental company or venue.

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Photography by ShootAnyAngle Wedding Photography


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Wedding Etiquette Breakdown

http://shootanyangle.com/weddings/Who knew there were so many rules when it came to weddings?  I never knew how many there really were until I was a bride myself.  It can be hard to keep track of for sure.  So, here’s a quick breakdown for you!

Announcing the Engagement

Make sure to call everyone close to you to notify them about the engagement prior to putting it on Facebook.  It’s very hurtful when a close friend or family member gets engaged and you find out on Facebook, not from the person directly (and I know from personal experience!).

Engagement Party Gifts

Simple answer: they are not required.

Rehearsal Dinners

This is up to the groom’s family to plan, host, and pay for.  Though the bride and groom can certainly give input, they should not help plan it as they have enough on their plate.  Likewise, guests with questions should go to the groom’s parents with them.  An invitation for the dinner is needed, but it can be as simple as an emailed notice of the event – just something so the guests know where to go and when.  Generally, the bridal party and their dates (along with the parents of the couple) are the guests to this event.

Invites & Save the Dateshttp://shootanyangle.com/weddings/

Save the Dates should be sent to people on your “A” list (i.e. people you really want to come), but not necessarily the full list (and do not send out more than your max capacity).  They should be sent out about 6 months prior and should include the wedding date and at least the city and state of the wedding.

Invites should be sent out to everyone on your “A” list (which should match your top number of guests) approximately 6-8 weeks before the wedding.  If it’s a destination wedding, feel free to send those out sooner.  It should include the date, the exact location, the time of the ceremony, and a way to RSVP.  This could be in the form of an RSVP card or a link to a website where they can learn more about the wedding and RSVP there.  And guests, RSVP as soon as you can.  Do not wait until the deadline, and above all, do not send it in late.

Brides and grooms, offering guests a “plus one” option is not mandatory, so you can choose if you wish to allow guests that option or not.  Weddings are certainly expensive enough without a plus one, so it’s fine if you choose not to offer it.  If you are okay adding some “plus ones,” but you want to put a limit on it, reserve those for guests who won’t know anyone else besides you.  Also, if you know someone can’t come, you should still send them an invite anyway (unless they’ve asked you not to).  Otherwise, they could feel offended.  It’s best to include a note with the invite that explains you know they can’t come but wanted them to have a copy of the invitation as a keepsake.

If the bride’s parents helped pay for the wedding, the wording should begin with both of the bride’s parents’ names followed by “request the honor of your presence at the wedding of their daughter” (or something similar) followed by the bride’s name and then the groom’s.  If the couple paid for the wedding on their own, the wording should begin with the bride and groom’s name followed by “request the honor of your presence at their wedding.”  If both sets of parents helped out financially, the wording should begin with the bride and groom’s named followed by “and their parents request the honor of your presence at their wedding.”  Of course, these are just guidelines, and they can definitely be altered to fit what you want to show on the invite!

Giftshttp://shootanyangle.com/weddings/

Gifts are typically given for bridal showers and the wedding itself.  How much to spend really depends on the guest’s budget, and they may choose to make something versus buy if that’s easier.  Typically, guests tend to spend around $100 a gift on weddings, and they can spend around $50 on shower gifts, but again, this is entirely up to the guest and what they are comfortable with.  It is best to stick to the wedding registry when choosing gifts, but a sentimental or handmade gift is also appreciated.

Brides should send out thank you notes as soon as possible, but the general rule is that they have one month to send out thank you notes from the time the gift was received.  In the note, it’s a good idea to mention what the gift was (i.e. “We love the gravy boat!”) so it’s personalized.  Also, it’s good to have them handwritten (I know, I wasn’t a fan of this one either because my handwriting is horrible) and both the bride and groom should sign it.

Guests, if you are writing a check to the couple, make sure to check if they have a joint account.  If they don’t, and you write the check out to both of them, they’ll have to go down to the bank and open a joint before they can cash or deposit it.  When in doubt, put the check in one name only.

Brides, you may get the majority of the gifts, but you still have some to give.  Brides give gifts to their parents, their bridesmaids, the groom, and anyone else who really helped out.  Grooms do the same on their side.

The Dress

A virgin wears white right?  Wrong.  I’m not sure how the old tradition got switched from wearing a veil to wearing white, but for some reason, most now believe the sign of purity is wearing all white.  Fashions have changed though.  Now, wearing a non-white dress is becoming more and more popular since not everyone looks their best in white – and those color dresses can be absolutely stunning!  Sometimes, a veil doesn’t go with the bride’s overall look.  Sometimes, the dress isn’t white.  And that’s absolutely fine.  As the bride, you should wear what makes you feel beautiful.  So, guests, make sure you never comment negatively about the fact that the bride chose a color other than white or decided not to wear a veil.  Nowadays, it really has nothing to do with “purity” just with beauty.

http://shootanyangle.com/weddings/Bar

Alcohol can be a wild card to throw into the mix, so always make sure to discuss with your partner as to what you’d like to do.  The typical options are to have no alcohol at all, just wine and champagne, or a full bar.  If having no alcohol, make sure that is noted on the invite, or better yet, on the wedding website.  Some guests may choose not to come if alcohol is not served.  If you’re just having wine and champagne, you can limit how much guests drink by having your caterers provide one glass to each guest.  You don’t have to note this on the invite or wedding website, but you certainly can.  If having a full bar, it’s generally expected that it will be an open bar (i.e. free), and that guests can come back as many times as they want.  For any alcohol, you will need to talk to your venue about a liquor license (this is generally passed onto the bride and groom to pay for). Oh, and guests, do remember there are photographers there taking pictures!

Guest Attire

The look and feel of the invitation generally lets people know the style of the wedding, and thus what is appropriate to wear.  It may not specifically state the attire, but if it’s an evening ballroom wedding, you can expect to dress up a bit fancier.  On the other hand, an outdoor garden wedding would be a perfect place to wear a nice sundress.  Of course, there are some rules that guests should abide by.  Read more about which rules matter on a past blog post, Wedding Guest Attire Rules: Brides Tell Us What Rules They Do and Don’t Care About.  It’s always nice to let guests know the attire on the wedding website if you can though.  This is especially true if it’s a themed wedding or if you have a very specific style you’d like guests to match.

Behavior

You’d think it goes without saying that you should always be on your best behavior at a wedding (regardless of your role), but sadly, some people do need reminding (check YouTube for examples).  That’s not to say you can’t let loose and have some fun, though!  Just know when to sit quietly and when to party.

As far as taking pictures during the ceremony goes, take your cue from the couple.  If there are no signs saying you can’t, and the officiant doesn’t request that phones and cameras are put away, then you can take pictures.  Just make sure flash is off and don’t reach your camera over your head or in the aisle to get the shot – you may just block the professional photographer!

Bridesmaid Duties and Who Hosts the Bridal Showerhttp://shootanyangle.com/weddings/

To learn more about bridesmaid duties, visit our past post here: Bridesmaid Protocol: What to Expect As a Bridesmaid, and What Brides Should Know.

Who Pays for What

Traditionally, the groom’s family pays for the rehearsal dinner, the marriage license, the officiant fees, the bride’s bouquet, the boutonnieres and the corsages, and even sometimes the honeymoon.  The bridesmaids handle their own attire, as do the groomsmen, and the couple pays for the rings.  So that means, the bride and her family would handle the rest (short end of the stick there, huh?).  That being said, things have changed, and brides and grooms are paying for a lot more than before.  That being said, if it’s your child, you should be pitching in some places, and not just the bare minimum.  If you can’t do that financially, then find ways to contribute your time to help take the pressure off the others.

Last names

Some women keep their maiden names.  Some hyphenate.  Some take their husband’s last name.  All are fine!!  It’s up to the bride as to what is best for her.

Social Media

Weddings are wonderful, but they are also incredibly stressful.  With stress comes tension and frustrations.  These are natural, but there is a time and a place to express that frustration – it’s not on social media.

Good luck!

Photos by ShootAnyAngle Wedding Photography.

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Wedding Fails

shootanyangle.com/weddings/When I was planning our wedding, I had one stress-reliever I could always to – I read articles and watched YouTube videos about wedding day fails.  I admit, this is an odd stress-reliever.  Here I am working my butt off to make sure that everything goes perfectly, and yet I’m watching videos of weddings gone horribly wrong.  Still, in some weird way, it calmed me down.  It made me laugh even when I was cringing, and it also made me happy to know that these disasters couldn’t happen to me.  After all, I wasn’t getting married on the edge of a pool.  And we didn’t have a tent with a center support poll and none of our guests were amateur poll dancers.  And we definitely were not going to have a horse-drawn carriage.  And our wedding cake wasn’t multi-tiered.  See what I mean?  Though cringe-worthy, these videos are also hilarious – of course, it’s much more likely to be funny when it isn’t happening to you!

Here are some real wedding “fails” from our readers.  Luckily, even though these events weren’t the best thing to have happen, they also weren’t all that bad in hindsight.  The motto of the story?  Even if everything doesn’t go absolutely prefect according to plan, the wedding will still be great!  After all, none of these things will stop you from marrying the love of your life!

“I was at a wedding where they had shrimp as an appetizer.  I was running around a lot, so shrimp was an easy thing to eat on the go.  Well, I didn’t think about the fact that it had been out all day.  It gave us all food poisoning!”

As someone who has had food poisoning before, I feel for this guest.  It’s a good lesson for all brides though: Be aware of how long your food can stay out and how long it has stayed out.

“My maid of honor didn’t get off work until super late the night before [my destination wedding] and then she needed step by step directions to get to town.  I was up all night the night before my wedding to get her there.”

This poor bride got no sleep before her big day, which is exactly when she needed it the most.  Bridesmaids, make sure to let your brides get some much needed rest during crucial times.  There’s always someone else to contact.

“Our wedding planner said that the weekend before us, a bridesmaid fainted just before the ceremony. Gotta keep hydrated in the tropical locations!”

Yes, you do!  Even if you aren’t in a tropical location, make sure to stay hydrated.  We don’t think about it much, but dehydration is the quickest way to have people drop like flies!

“My sister was getting married in her yard in Alamo. The chairs were setup in a row on the grass, the caterers had come in and set up a cocktail table for before the ceremony, along with the beautiful wedding cake table. It was a beautiful sunny, warm day under the umbrella a huge oak trees. As my sister and her husband were exchanging vows, I looked over at the cake table, seeing something in the corner of my eye, and found it was ‘Buddy,’ their black cat, licking the frosting off the wedding cake……. it was hysterical!!”

Even cats like cake!  If you are having a wedding close to animals, make sure they are put away in a back room with a water and food bowl.  Or at least keep the food out of range in the case of a dog.

“My mother-in-law called her friends and, knowing very well we hadn’t been able to invite them, told them all they were invited.  Then she called us, told us exactly what she did, and said ‘Now if you don’t want them there, YOU have to tell them!'”

Cringe!  This one particularly is like nails on a chalkboard.  Parents, this is your child’s big day.  Sure, you can ask that certain people are invited, but the final decision is up to the bride and groom.  Please don’t become an example of a “dreaded in-law!”

“When one of my husband’s cousins got married, a different cousin got so hammered that she tore a cabinet door off in the bathroom.”

Haha!  This would have been pretty funny to witness, but it also probably fell to the bride and groom to pay for.  As a guest, you are certainly welcome to have fun – but in moderation.  And if you ever cause damage to any property, you should pay for it.

“Our bathrooms broke down at our reception hall.”

Yikes!  Luckily, in this case, there were other bathrooms on the property that were accessible, albeit a bit of a walk away.  Though I never would have thought of it for my own wedding, it’s probably not a bad idea to ask your vendor where the second closest bathrooms are in case the closest ones become unusable.

“At one wedding, a bridesmaid got really drunk and tried to do a table dance.  All she succeeded in doing was shattering champagne glasses.”

Many times, the biggest setbacks come from drunk guests, so being able to control the alcohol intake (one glass per person or asking the bartender to cut people off) is a good idea.  And again, if you were the drunk guest, you’re paying the bride and groom back for those glasses that they inevitably got a bill for.

“The food came in catering tin containers and were supposed to be in stainless steel platters with lids and burners underneath to keep them warm.”

A warm dinner is definitely ideal, so it’s a shame that the caterers messed this up.  Though there is not much you can do at the venue if this situation arises, do ask your caterer for a portion of your money back or a coupon for future services to make up for their mishap.

‘[When sending out my invites] I had terrible luck with the mail.  Three invites and two RSVP cards were sent back ripped.  Then, a contract…”

We luckily only had this happen to one of our invites, but I still cringe to think of this poor bride’s position.  What are they doing at that post office?  Are rabid dogs working there?  In this case, the bride did talk to the post office with no luck, but that is a good first step.  Another option is using a different location.  And don’t worry, guests understand it was the post office, not you.

“[I was at a wedding where] when toasts were being given, some guy drunkenly got the mic and slurred something about a goat, and ‘Let’s give it up for Dave!’  To this day, none of us know who ‘Dave’ is.”

I love this one.  The lesson here is keep the mic guarded.  Ask the DJ to stay with it, or have groomsmen keep an eye on it.  Otherwise, it becomes a loud speaker for someone who has had too much to drink.

Have any other wedding fails, big or small?  Let us know, and we’ll add them here!

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Photography by ShootAnyAngle Wedding Photography


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The Wedding Night

ShootAnyAngle.com/weddings/Everytime I think about this topic, I just think of that “let’s talk about sex” song.  It can definitely be an uneasy topic.  Of course, the one thing everyone assumes will happen the night of the wedding is a consummation of the vows, aka sex.  Oddly enough though, that’s often what doesn’t happen.

A good friend of ours says it best as he tells the story of his wedding night: “I carried her across the threshold and into the bedroom.  I carefully unzipped her dress and slid it off her body…. And then we went to sleep.”  The truth of the matter is that you’re often exhausted that night.  It’s the culmination of a year or so of planning and stress, a full day of being styled and prepped and dressed to the nines, smiling and visiting with others, dancing the night away, barely eating, and a whole lot of emotion!  You’ll be lucky to even make it to the hotel room let alone have energy for amorous activities.  That being said, you definitely can manage to do it all, but it might take an extra cup of coffee!

After our wedding and at the hotel, my husband quickly broke out the take home containers that held our second dinner as I pulled the bobby pins out of my hair, counting each one as I did (32 – surprisingly, it fell short of my record of 52).  We quickly realized that we were missing something – utensils!!  My husband, ever the MacGyver, took out his pocket knife and two empty water bottles and cut off the tops to make two scoopers that we could shovel the food into our mouths with.  It was so much fun!  I love that we forgot utensils so we would have that fun memory forever.  We then proceeded to watch the end of The Time Machine. Yes, the part with the creepy underground dwellers and Jeremy Irons looking absolutely terrifying.  Still, in an odd way, it was relaxing to just watch a movie and know our wedding planning stress was all behind us.

Even if you do plan to do, uh, something, I recommend at least taking a breather first, but it’s not critical for it to be that night either.  Whatever you both choose to do that night is fine as long as it’s about the two of you, together, starting your marriage.  Just don’t be too disappointed if those plans change at the last minute.  After all, you two have the rest of your lives for that.  😉


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What to Know About Vow Renewals

I recently had the pleasure of photographing a vow renewal of a couple in their 80s.  It’s so inspiring to see a couple still happily married years after their first “I do.”  A Vow Renewal can be a really sweet and great way to renew the marriage.  Some couples prefer a quiet ceremony with just the two of them, but others prefer to have a party along with the renewal.  Both are great options if you’re interested in re-committing to each other.

When is a Renewal appropriate?

An anniversary milestone

Celebrating your 10 year anniversary?  15?  20?  30?  That’s the perfect time for a vow renewal.  Some would argue that 5 years is a bit too early, but it is still a milestone, so it’s acceptable!  If you can’t do it on the milestone for whatever reason (interfering with another wedding, illness, absence, etc) then you can do it off of the milestone year.

Anytime past the age of 70

If you’re over 70, you don’t need to wait for a milestone because you’ve had plenty already!  Plus, at that age, you’ve most-likely been with your partner for a long time, so a renewal at anytime is fine.

There are no other weddings happening

If you’d like a big party for your vow renewal, but there’s another wedding going on in your family or in your small group of friends, it’s not the right time (even if you’re celebrating a milestone).  It’s the other couple’s time for the spotlight, so you need to let them have their moment.  So, if a wedding has occurred or will be occurring within a year of your renewal (and you want to make it like a second wedding), then hold off.  If you’re just having a private renewal on the beach and no party element though (or if you’re over 70 years old), then it’s fine to do at anytime.

Are guests required to bring gifts?

The short answer is “no.”  The purpose of wedding gifts is to help the couple start their life together and to provide supplies for their new home.  Since a renewal couple has already been living together, the couple shouldn’t expect gifts.  That being said, if you wish to give a gift as a guest, you certainly can.  Focus on sentimentality versus functionality.  For example, have a print made of their wedding picture or a photo album of their lives together thus far.

Is the couple required to provide a meal to guests?

If a party or reception element is part of the renewal, then it’s a good idea to provide food of some sort.  Appetizers are perfectly acceptable though!  It’s also fine to invite everyone to a restaurant.  As long as you’re clear about it being “dutch treat” up front, then you can all have a meal together without you paying for the bill.

Is a vow renewal a second wedding?

No, but it can still be a big party, though!  Some people do make it like a second wedding, especially if their first wedding was smaller than they had originally wanted.  Though this is done, be aware that some guests may look at a second wedding negatively especially if it’s really like a full wedding.  In those cases, some people may think the renewal is for a purpose other than the desire to re-commit (such as trying to get gifts).  A vow renewal is only appropriate if you wish to focus on the commitment of your marriage.  As long as that’s clear, that’s what matters.

Should I wear a wedding dress?

You don’t have to, but some women prefer to (it’s always fun to get to wear a wedding dress!).  It’s pretty common to see episodes of “Say Yes to the Dress” where women are picking out wedding dresses for their renewals.  So, you certainly can wear a wedding dress, and you could even wear your original wedding dress if it still fits.  You can also wear any dress you’d like.  The dress doesn’t need to be white either.  Wear whatever you feel beautiful in!

Congratulations!

Photos by ShootAnyAngle Wedding Photography.

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What Not To Do Before the Wedding

http://shootanyangle.com/weddings/

There is lots and lots to do before the big day, but there is also a lot NOT to do.  Here are the top five things not to do in the months (and days) before your wedding!

1. Don’t try anything new in the beauty department.

Never tried eyebrow waxing?  Don’t start the day before the wedding.  You could break out in a rash, and that’s the last thing you want!  Never tried spray tanning? Never dyed your hair?  Don’t start before the wedding!  The color could be all wrong with no time to fix it.  Never used mousse?  Don’t start the day of the wedding unless you want to turn your hair into a hard shell.  We’ve all heard of hair and makeup trials, and they’re popular for good reason.  Try things WELL in advance to avoid beauty mishaps.

2.  Don’t starve yourself.

You’ll be stressed out enough before the wedding.  Starving yourself will only make it worse, and it’s not necessary (or healthy!).  Be kind to yourself, and eat well (throw some treats in there too).

3. Don’t second guess your wedding choices.

A month out, your choices in vendors, colors, dresses, etc are pretty much set in stone.  True, some last minute changes are possible, but keep them to a minimum.  Otherwise, you’ll just drive yourself crazy (and your fiancé too), and you may end up with no vendor at all!

4.  Don’t spend too much time out in the sun (especially with straps).

Too much time in the sun isn’t good for anyone, but especially not before the wedding.  You don’t want a sunburn, awkward tan lines, or peeling skin on the big day.

5.  Don’t push yourself too hard.

It won’t be easy during the crunch time, but you need to take some time for you (and for the two of you).  Get enough sleep, go for walks, take breaks from your phone (which will probably be constantly notifying you of something or other), and do whatever you need to do to stay calm and marry on!

Photos by ShootAnyAngle Wedding Photography.

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How to Deal With Post-Wedding Blues

Photo courtesy of Susie Hannibal

Your wedding day is bound to be the happiest day of your life thus far.  It’s a busy but fantastic day that is the cumulation of generally a year of planning and years of courtship prior to that.  For that day, you feel like a princess, a celebrity.  Everyone knows you and is complimenting you, giving you gifts, taking pictures of you – and whether or not you are generally someone who likes all that attention, it will become very odd when it’s suddenly all gone.  And it will be the very next day.

Sure, weddings are really about vowing to spend the rest of your life with the one you love, but it does become more than that whether we want it to or not – and we get used to that.  We’re only humans after all!  But what happens when all the planning is over, and the attention is gone, and you realize the big day that your life was circling around has now been completed?  Well, for many brides and even some grooms out there, it can lead to post-wedding blues.  Even though the wedding is over, the marriage is just beginning, so what are some things you can do to get past it?

Take a Breather

We all need a bit of a breather first.  Weddings are exhausting!!!  So, allow yourself the relaxation time.  It’s okay to take an extra-long soak in the tub.  It’s okay to watch a few more episodes on TV than you usually do.  It’s okay to sleep in on the weekends.  Take some down time.  Your new hubby will need some too, so take that breather together!

Do Wedding Related Projects

Oddly enough, even if the wedding is over, the projects aren’t.  You still have thank you notes to write (and only a month to do them in), social media albums to make, photo books to make, canvas prints to order, etc.  Most couples have pictures of their wedding day and photo albums of it in their home, so now is the time to get those done!

Plan a Couple-Only Day

Since odds are that you both took time off work, you may find yourself overwhelmed after returning from the wedding and honeymoon only to be met by a wall of work that accumulated while you were out.  It may seem hard to carve out a moment just for you two.  It’s really important to get that time though.  You’re newlyweds after all!  Plan a time to do something just the two of you.  Even if you can’t get away for a full day, and even if money is tight (it usually is after a wedding!), you can still find free and short things to do: go for a walk in the park, watch one of your favorite DVDs together, make dinner together, go to the beach and watch the sunset.  There are lots of options in regards to activities, but make sure it’s just the two of you.

Plan Something To Look Forward To

Let’s face it: a wedding is really just a big party, so you’ve really been a party-planner for a year or so.  If you have post-wedding blues, it may be the planning that you miss.  So, plan something new!  Offer to plan someone’s birthday party, or plan a tea-party, or plan a thank-you-to-everyone-who-helped-out-at-our-wedding party.  Put those new-found skills to good use!

Get Dressed Up

Brides sometimes don’t feel as pretty after a wedding.  After all, their hairstylist and make-up artist and dress designer aren’t there everyday!  We all look our best on our wedding day, so the days that follow are a bit of a let down in the beauty department.  So, get dressed up!  Do your hair and make-up, put on your favorite dress (no, not the wedding dress) and go out to dinner with your hubby, or plan something at home.  It’ll help give you a little pick-me-up.

Pick Up a New Life Project

Your life was circling around the planning of the wedding, and now you find yourself with free time on your hands.  Put that energy towards a new life project.  Want a different career?  Put that energy towards that.  Or maybe you want to re-do parts of the house, or rejuvenate your relationship with family.  Whatever it is, use the new free time for that.

And most of all, focus on the positive – you just married the love of your life!

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